Illustration for article titled Last Call: What’s been your weirdest quarantine purchase?
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Last CallLast CallLast Call is The Takeout’s online watering hole where you can chat, share recipes, and use the comment section as an open thread. Here’s what we’ve been reading/watching/listening around the office today.

Are all your loved ones dyeing their hair while sheltering in place? Mine are. Every shade of the rainbow, and it looks great on each and every one of them. There’s no reason that it should take an extended period of isolation to make people stop and consider that sapphire blue or bubble gum pink might be a good look for them, but I suppose for some of us, it takes just the right to-hell-with-it national moment to go ahead and start looking the way you want to look.

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It’s funny to think that sales of something like hair dye might be spiking right now, in a time when grocery lists are carefully curated and non-essential purchases are being placed on the back burner. It’s the non-necessity of the thing that makes it so tempting in a moment of such practicality. I know a lot of us have caved and bought new jigsaw puzzles, too, or Nintendo Switches, or a fresh embroidery hoop (just me on that last one, or...?). Anything that seems silly to deny ourselves when we’re all just trying our best to make home the place we want to be. Or, alternatively, something we never would have expected of ourselves before—something that it took a national emergency to awaken in our souls. (See also: exercise equipment and/or pet iguanas.)

So I ask you: what is the strangest or most unexpected thing you’ve bought during the current quarantine? Maybe you stocked up on rarely purchased comfort foods or treated yourself to the new Mountain Dew (sorry, MTN DEW) flavor. Maybe you’re invoking the power of positive thinking by ordering a bridesmaid dress for an upcoming summer wedding. Maybe you’ve decided that now is the time to reacquaint yourself with the Play-Doh Fun Factory. Whatever the purchase, we want to hear about it. And if anyone has any ideas for a new term that can replace “retail therapy,” we’d welcome those, too.

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Marnie Shure is editor in chief of The Takeout.

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