Last Call: Which of these Star Wars kitchen products is the most excessive?

A sweet treat on display at Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge in Anaheim, California.
Photo: Amy Sussman (Getty Images)
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The Star Wars fans of the world can finally rest easy knowing that someone, somewhere, has thought to produce branded merchandise that aligns with their interests. Williams-Sonoma, carrying on their grand tradition of selling IP-related kitchenware in irresistible bundles, has unleashed upon shoppers a tidal wave of intergalactic merch, including an exclusive line of Instant Pots designed to resemble the classically Instant-Pot-shaped R2-D2, the traditionally spherical BB-8, and the definitely-not-even-close-to-Instant-Pot-sized Chewbacca. (On the plus side, this does mean you no longer have to tape fur and a homemade bandolier to your unadorned Instant Pot to express your appreciation of film.)

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In true Williams-Sonoma fashion, even their most niche, expensive, unnecessary kitchen items (or perhaps especially these items) are beautiful objects to have on display in your home. Provided, of course, that guests understand the references. Otherwise, a Han Solo Carbonite Signature Roaster might look like a $450 Halloween horror display, along with C-3PO cakelets mistaken for macabre skulls.

Sure, no one needs any of this stuff, and Williams-Sonoma knows that as well as we do—it’s just that the most delightful gifts are often the ones we’d never buy for ourselves. So if you can think of anyone who would be moved by a Storm Trooper toaster, and you have 50 spare dollars to make that dream come true, then you know what to do. The rest of us will be hitting up the restaurant supply store for a humble mixing bowl or two.

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About the author

Marnie Shure

Marnie Shure is editor in chief of The Takeout.