We’re not sure why you’d want to relive Squid Game, but now you can at a Beijing bakery

Customers at a bakery in Beijing can try one of the challenges from the Netflix show. DON'T CHOOSE THE UMBRELLA.

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A customer at a business in Shanghai cuts a dalgona, a crisp sugar candy featured in the Netflix series Squid Game.
A customer at a business in Shanghai cuts a dalgona, a crisp sugar candy featured in the Netflix series Squid Game.
Photo: HECTOR RETAMAL / Contributor (Getty Images)

Sugar, playground games, and deadly stakes make for fun for the whole family, am I right? If you’ve turned on Netflix in the past few weeks, then you probably already know where this story is going—Squid Game.

Aside from taking over everyone’s Halloween costume this year and skyrocketing sales of white Vans, Reuters reports that the Netflix show has inspired a bakery in Beijing to host a Squid Game–themed confection-making challenge. (Spoiler alert!) In the episode of Squid Game where this particular challenge takes place, contestants are told to carve a shape perfectly out of the center of a very delicate sugar candy using just a tiny needle. The simpler the shape, like a circle or triangle, the better shot you have at carving without a crack.

Customers can pay $9 (58 yuan) to try their hand at making the candy called dalgona. The candy is a mixture of sugar and baking soda which you try to form into a neatly shaped biscuit. If you successfully mold the mixture into shape, you win, and if you don’t, you die.

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I’m kidding. The challenge is completely harmless. In fact, it’s actually kind of boring. Nothing happens if you lose and there’s no prize for winners, either. Apparently, the lack of deadly consequences doesn’t matter though because people still have some minor PTSD from watching the show.

A 27-year-old contestant, Li Zi, thought she had the challenge beat, but tragedy struck. “But then I got to this one, and broke it,” she said. “And then I subconsciously started shaking a little with nerves as I thought about the show.”

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Call me twisted, but without the threat of death or possibility of life-altering wealth riddled with guilt, the challenge of mixing and forming sugar candy just doesn’t have the same oomph behind it.