Screenshot: YouTube

Both my boyfriend and my best friend are left-handed, and through the years, I’ve noticed the small ways in which this fact makes life just one iota more difficult. When my best friend took hand-written notes in school, for example, her left hand bumped up against the notebooks’ spirals, or smudged certain types of ink. But I’ve never noticed either of them to have a problem cutting steak. LongHorn Steakhouse, though, says the shape of traditional steak knives makes them difficult for left-handed people to use.

Is this even true?

In a press release announcing LongHorn’s celebration of International Left-Handers Day on August 13, the steak chain boasts that three of its locations will that day “offer custom steak knives that meet the needs of left-handed carnivores.” (Those locations are in Des Plaines, Illinois; St. Petersburg, Florida; and Millville, New Jersey.) Standard steak knives, it says, have the “serrated edge angled toward the right side of the knife’s blade,” forcing lefties “to cut with their non-dominant hand or sacrifice the quality of their bite by sawing through their steak with the dull edge of their knife.”

Photo: LongHorn Steakhouse

I read this with one eyebrow raised, and of course immediately shouted for my boyfriend to weigh in.

“HEY. HEY. QUESTION FOR YOU,” I scream from one room to the next. “DO YOU HAVE A PROBLEM CUTTING STEAK BECAUSE YOU’RE LEFT-HANDED?”

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My boyfriend peeks around the wall’s corner with an equally confused expression.

“No,” he says. “I use my right hand to hold the knife.”

Left-handed readers, is this really something you’re begging for? Special steak knives? (It seems to me that most lefties’ true dining peeve is being seated too close to a wall on their left side so their elbow knocks into it while they eat.)

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After some careful consideration, The Takeout has decided that this is based on faulty pseudoscience, and therefore, is bullshit. Does the texture of the steak really suffer if you’re eating a piece of steak cut from the supposed “dull side”? The serration comes at the bottom of the knife, and therefore, both left- and right-handed users experience a uniform texture. And if this, in fact, is a problem, why not just flip the steak around?

In the end, we’re guessing LongHorn Steakhouse probably turned a blind eye to logic, and may have—shocker!—done all this with the publicity in mind. The company may not have totally hit their target wth this International Left-Handers Day promotion, but we do give them credit for coming up with a promotion that totally got our humble food website to cover their restaurants. Bravo.