Photo: RiverNorthPhotography (iStock)

Little Caesars normally uses its Facebook page to post videos or promote new pizza deals, but this week, it had a more serious mission: to warn the public of a “fraudulent” Little Caesars coupon that could download a virus onto people’s computers. The coupon, which advertises three free large pizzas to celebrate the chain’s 60th anniversary, is not associated with Little Caesars, and the pizza chain says it is “monitoring the situation and diligently working to resolve this issue.”

Who would stoop so low as to dangle three free pizzas, only to surreptitiously infect our computers with viruses? Who would destroy America’s trust like that? It’s like vandalizing an orphanage, or handing a passing a marathon runner a cup of vinegar, or playing bacon-keep-away with a puppy for 30 straight minutes. If we can’t believe in pizza coupons, what can we believe in? I find myself resisting the slip into pizzeria paranoia.

Many of the comments on the Little Caesars’ Facebook post call the people who fell for the coupon scam “gullible,” since Little Caesars pizzas are already so cheap. Another commenter asks the question I myself was fearfully asking: “How do I know you’re the real Little Caesars?”

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