Last Call: What Burning Man teaches us about urban planning

In 2000, just 27,000 people attended Burning Man. Last year, that number was more than 70,000.
In 2000, just 27,000 people attended Burning Man. Last year, that number was more than 70,000.
Photo: David McNew (Getty Images)
Last CallLast CallLast Call is The Takeout’s online watering hole where you can chat, share recipes, and use the comment section as an open thread. Here’s what we’ve been reading/watching/listening around the office today.


The infrastructure of Black Rock City

Illustration for article titled Last Call: What Burning Man teaches us about urban planning
Photo: David McNew (Getty Images)
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To the outsider, Burning Man (taking place now through September 3) has a reputation as a dusty, druggy art-orgy. But it’s also quite the organizational feat: As this Wired piece from last year notes, participants essentially build and tear down a 70,000-person city in the course of two months. The gathering is, of course, unlike a true city in many ways—its inhabitants are overwhelmingly white, male, and rich; it also takes place on federal land—but its implications for urban planning are still interesting to consider. So give that Wired article a read. [Kate Bernot]


Foul ball beer chug

Once again, summer draws to a close, and I realize I haven’t been to nearly enough baseball games this year. Which means I’m missing moments like this one, in which a Chicago Cubs fan behind home plate at Wrigley caught an Anthony Rizzo foul ball in his nearly full beer. To the delight of the crowd, the guy chugs the whole thing. An emboldened Rizzo then hits a stand-up double for an RBI, tying the game. I can’t even think of a Cubs-ier moment. Just wait ’til next year! [Gwen Ihnat]

Gwen Ihnat is the Editorial Coordinator for The A.V. Club.

Kate Bernot is a freelance writer and a certified beer judge. She was previously managing editor at The Takeout.

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DISCUSSION

ubercultute
uberculture

Seemingly ages ago, I was an Architecture major with ideas about urban planning. I don’t think I get the nuance of the programmatic needs of Burning Man enough to have an opinion on the design, other than to say the clock/street arrangement is novel.  But then, take a look at DC.  L'Enfant may be the real reason for calling French fries Freedom fries.