Last Call: There’s a weird amount of data on your snacking

Photo: carotur (iStock)
Last CallLast CallLast Call is The Takeout’s online watering hole where you can chat, share recipes, and use the comment section as an open thread. Here’s what we’ve been reading/watching/listening around the office today.

If the name Mondelez International doesn’t ring a bell, the many brands under its mighty umbrella certainly do. Cadbury, BelVita, Honey Maid, Nabisco, Enjoy Life, Oreo, Wheat Thins, Ritz, Triscuit—it’s a powerhouse of snacking. Indeed, the company has just released its very first and very official State Of Snacking report, a survey of over 6,000 adults in 12 countries, to track what we’re all putting in our bodies between meals. The results look great if you’re a cracker-and-cookie conglomerate.

Among the more interesting findings is that 70% of Millennials tend to see snacks as meal replacements, and that more than half of all adults say “quick, on-the-go bites are more suited to their lifestyle than full meals.” Of course, the data—while flattering of any snack company—could be read a different way. Millennials might contentedly munch on Cheez-Its at their desks but secretly pine for a lunch break, the real kind they used to see in TV shows about office jobs but feel pressured to eschew. You might throw back a fistful of almonds in the car to take the edge off your hunger when you’re “on the go,” but maybe it’s because you’re driving for a delivery app that keeps cutting your pay, and you need to work more hours to make up the difference. This doesn’t mean snack foods aren’t delicious and comforting, but when 73% of respondents say they typically snack to “relieve anxiety,” you have to wonder whether food is always capable of all that we expect from it.

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What is your snack of choice? Does it do its part to quell any feelings of existential dread that might arise between meals? 

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About the author

Marnie Shure

Marnie Shure is editor in chief of The Takeout.