Last Call: Tell us about your favorite food museum

Inside the Instant Noodles Museum in Shanghai
Inside the Instant Noodles Museum in Shanghai
Photo: VCG (Getty Images)

There’s something especially delightful about a small museum. It feels more manageable than a gigantic institution like the Louvre or the Met. It doesn’t require a full day to visit or serious study of the exhibitions map to make sure you see everything worthwhile. You get the chance to go deep into something extremely specific, like poster art from the Mao era in China. If you’re lucky, you’ll get to have a nice chat with the proprietor/curator, someone who has the sort of deep knowledge you can only get from a longtime obsession and who is very excited to share it with you. You may not plan an entire vacation around a small museum, but it’s a fun way to spend a few hours in an unfamiliar place.

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If you are reading this, it’s probably because you enjoy food and eating, and so I would guess you would be particularly delighted by a food museum. Atlas Obscura has very kindly produced a list of the world’s finest food museums, from Beijing to Brazil and all points in between. There are museums dedicated to Jell-O, Spam, Big Macs, celebrity leftovers, peppermint, fermented shark, chocolate, cheese in general, Västerbotten cheese in particular, coffee, absinthe, cucumbers, watermelon, ramen, kimchi, carrots, food additives, the art of butchery, marzipan (actually there are two), butter (ditto), bananas (ditto), and salt and pepper shakers (three). Have you visited any of these food museums? Which would you recommend?

Associate editor of The Takeout. Chicagoan. Owned by dog.

DISCUSSION

conductedinpeaceclosedinharmony
ConductedInPeaceClosedInHarmony

Mount Horeb WI has a mustard museum I have long wanted to visit.

San Jose CA had a doughnut shop that doubled as a military museum.