Bawitdabad business model? Kid Rock to close his Detroit restaurant

Photo: Raymond Boyd (Getty Images)

How things can change in just two short years. In September 2017, things looked bright for Kid Rock: His album Sweet Southern Sugar was poised to debut eighth on the Billboard 200 chart, he opened his own restaurant, Made in Detroit, at Little Caesars Arena, and he hadn’t yet gone on a profane rant against Oprah Winfrey while intoxicated at his Honky Tonk bar in Nashville. Heady times.

Crain’s Detroit reports that Kid Rock is now closing Made in Detroit, opting against renewing its lease within the hockey stadium this coming April. This announcement comes just a week after a video of Kid Rock’s anti-Oprah rant was released by TMZ; in response to public outcry over his comments in the video, Kid Rock posted on Facebook, “I have a big mouth and drink too much sometimes, shocker! I also work hard and do a ton to help others out but that’s just back page news because the press hates I love Trump.”

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Whether the closure of Made in Detroit is related to the recent Kid Rock backlash can’t be known for sure, but as the Detroit Free Press notes, the singer’s statement on the closing of his restaurant is bound up with assorted defenses that imply a connection between the two. “I appreciate all who have patronized [Made in Detroit] and still have much love for the City of Detroit and the people / organizations that I have helped there for years, black, white, whatever,” the artist said. He later concludes, “I may be guilty of being a loud mouth jerk at times, but trying to label me racist is a joke, and actually only does a disservice to the black community, which I have supported my entire life, by trying to alienate myself and many others.”

And, perhaps sensing the need for damage control, the owners of Little Caesars and the arena said in a statement, “As our venues are open, inviting, inclusive, and respectful to all, we look forward to bringing on an exciting new concept that aligns with our community and company values.”

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Marnie Shure

Marnie Shure is editor in chief of The Takeout.