Fox News anchor doesn't believe in tipping baristas

Illustration for article titled Fox News anchor doesnt believe in tipping baristas
Photo: Boogich (iStock)

Yesterday, a gaggle of Fox News commentators decided to have a discussion about tipping servers and baristas. It went exactly as you might imagine:

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This is a topic our own Salty Waitress has covered before, in case you don’t know the answer to this question. Honestly, I’m a little sad that the folks at Fox News aren’t reading The Takeout. I think they’d find us both useful and amusing. But I digress.

First, I would like to point out the problems with that chyron: “20% tip for bad service.” A tip is not a reward system—it is the majority of a server’s salary. The federal minimum wage for tipped employees is $2.13 an hour because, according to the government, the expectation is that the customer will cover the additional $5.13 so that the server can make minimum wage. Good service has absolutely nothing to do with tipping: the customer is responsible for a employee wages, full stop. No matter how poor you think the service is, you still need to tip at least 20% on your check.

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But back to Jesse Watters who, in this clip, is discussing tipping baristas and cafe employees, who do make minimum wage. First: understand that cafe tips are pooled; that extra dollar you’re paying is being distributed to all the staff, so the person who is “just handing you a cup of coffee” is only getting a few cents out of that tip. At the end of the day, they’re maybe bringing home an extra $1 an hour on top of minimum wage.

Secondly, let’s talk about what’s expected for many coffee shop employees for minimum wage. Sure, the handing over your cup is part of the job. There’s also making the more complicated espresso drinks. There’s being on your feet for eight hours. There’s customer service which, if you’ve ever been observant while waiting on line for coffee, is a terrible job (I often write in coffee shops, and the behavior I witness on a daily basis is appalling). There’s heavy lifting, inventory, ordering, cleaning—it’s a lot of hard, hands on work. And, as implied by the chyron, it actually takes skill, because if it were easy, there would be no such thing as bad service.

Jesse Watters, on the other hand, is paid over $15,000 a week to sit on a couch and chat.

Tip your goddamn baristas.

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Allison Robicelli is The Takeout staff writer, a former professional chef, author of three books, and The People's Hot Pocket Princess. Questions about recipes/need cooking advice? Tweet @Robicellis.

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DISCUSSION

revengenceralf
RevengencerAlf

I gotta be honest here. While I tip when I get coffee, and I feel like other people should... This isn’t really that hot of a take. Based on my observations, I’d be absolutely shocked if the tips in the jar at a Starbucks or Dunkin’ come from even half the people who ordered. It’s a smaller portion of the customer base propping it up. At least in the northeast it’s not even that uncommon for some of them to not even have a tip jar.

While I don’t agree with the dickhead logic they use to justify it, tip creep is a real thing that’s happening. Tip jars are showing up in front of pretty much any retail-service job now and these people do get paid a full wage without those tips. They’re probably underpaid for the work they do and that’s part of why I do tip but if we’re being completely honest, most of the ‘unskilled labor’ employees you interact with on a daily basis are probably underpaid by about the same ratio and we’re only expected to tip on the ones it’s socially convenient to guilt people into doing it.