Daniel Ricciardo of Australia and Red Bull Racing celebrates on the podium with a shoey during the Formula One Grand Prix of China.
Photo: Lars Baron (Getty Images)

If I won a professional sporting event—an occurrence less likely to happen than a huge meteor crashing into our planet—I would celebrate by spraying expensive Champagne all over directly into my mouth. Apparently, Formula One drivers don’t need the fancy Champagne bottle; instead, some celebrate by “doing a shoey,” which is drinking booze out of a disgusting shoe. And now, it’s come to light that Formula One has trademarked this icky feat (icky feet?), just in case others want to get in on the shoey action.

SB Nation notes the shoey practice goes back more than a decade, and was specifically popularized by Australian racer Daniel Ricciardo, an avid shoey-er who most recently showed off the move following his win at last month’s Chinese Grand Prix. (Previously, he’d even convinced Sir Patrick Stewart to drink out of his sneaker, which is somehow much worse than drinking out of your own shoe.) Though the term wasn’t invent by Formula One, the racing league received a trademark for it in 25 countries. It’s generally agreed by people who keep track of booze-in-shoe history that an Australian surfing and fishing company called The Mad Hueys originated the um, ritual.

According to the Independent, though, Formula One’s filing with the World Intellectual Property Organization covers flasks, glasses, bottles, mugs, sculptures and figurines, which almost 100 percent guarantees Formula One will start selling shoe-shaped drinking mugs posthaste.