A food truck named Curbin' Cuisine jumps curb, crashes into home

Photo: vadimguzhva (iStock)

In a stroke of cosmic irony or unfortunate branding, a food truck jumped a curb and crashed into a house in West Des Moines, Iowa, a detail we would otherwise not devote much digital space if the food truck wasn’t named Curbin’ Cuisine.

Let’s get it out of the way: No one was seriously hurt, thank goodness, though Des Moines news station KCCI reports a resident inside the home was only a few feet away from where the food truck crashed through the wall. Thomas Avila, who rents the house from his father, told KCCI that he at first thought the crash was an explosion. “It twisted the whole house when it hit… It sheered the concrete pretty clean.” The accident is still under investigation, and no files have been charged. But Avila reports about the unlucky house: “There’s not any chance we will be able to live in this again.”

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What’s notable was this was the second time the food truck was involved in a crash in as many months. The unfortunate driver told KCCI that the truck throttle was stuck, which is how he lost control of the truck (with his wife in the passenger seat) and couldn’t stop. They had to be extricated from the vehicle, but are reported to be okay. But KCCI notes that “Video taken Feb. 9 shows a nearly identical situation in which the same truck lost control near the Eighth Street exit ramp on Interstate 235.”

Food trucks are a tough business, as most restaurant gigs are. Maintenance especially for these vehicles are expensive, and a day spent in the mechanic is a day not slinging sandwiches. We sincerely wish the good folks at Curbin’ Cuisine a few things: 1) Get that throttle fixed! (KCCI reports the food truck owners are in the market for a new truck to continue their food business) and 2) That they get back on their feet soon, because Philly cheesesteak fries and garlic parm pretzel bombs sound pretty delicious.

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About the author

Kevin Pang

Kevin Pang was the founder and editor-in-chief of The Takeout, and director of the documentary For Grace on Netflix.