Vote 2020 graphic
Everything you need to know about and expect during
the most important election of our lifetimes

Florida man (of course) sues McDonald’s for McNuggets injury

A box of Chicken McNuggets
Beware...
Photo: picture alliance (Getty Images)

Alexei Stolfat can’t help that he’s a Florida man. Well, I suppose, technically, he could have moved just about anywhere else, but I don’t begrudge him his decision to live in Palm Beach, especially in February. He also can’t help that he cracked his tooth last March on an errant bone he found in a McNugget. But since he filed a lawsuit against McDonald’s for this McNugget injury, we can’t help writing this ridiculous-sounding headline.

Advertisement

Anyway, the facts, as Stolfat tells them, are that in March, he and his wife ordered some Mickey-D’s through Uber Eats. When he bit down on his McNugget, his teeth hit something hard and, as his lawsuit reports, he felt “unbearable jaw pain.” The culprit turned out to be a .8 inch-long bone. (Stolfat removed it from his mouth and photographed it, as you do.) Over the next few days, he felt a toothache and headache, and when he went to a dentist, he was diagnosed with two microcracks in his tooth. Stolfat doesn’t have dental insurance and he estimated it would be six months before he could cover the expenses of replacing the tooth on his own.

So Stolfat did what any self-respecting Florida man would do: he sued McDonald’s, demanding $1.1 million and, more crucially, a complete recall of McNuggets—which I’m sure would lead to an uprising, should the case progress to the point where a judge would rule against McDonald’s and accede to all of Stolfat’s demands.

Advertisement

Stolfat says he isn’t doing this out of greed. After he pays for his new tooth, he plans to donate the rest of the money to charity. “I’m not looking to be famous in this case or something like that,” Stolfat told Today. “I want to help other people, to protect them and tell them to be very careful with McNuggets.”

McDonald’s says that it is looking into the complaint.

Aimee Levitt is associate editor of The Takeout.

Share This Story

Get our newsletter

DISCUSSION

eddie-brannan
Eddie-Brannan

it would be six months before he could cover the expenses of replacing the tooth on his own

Extraction and replacing the the tooth is a last-resort option, only undertaken if the crack has widened and severely damaged the tooth, which would probably take years. Bonding the crack with a plastic resin is the standard treatment, with a crown the next step if the damaged has worsened over time.

Bonding is relatively inexpensive compared to other dental treatments, costing anywhere between $100-400.