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Now you can eat some of the beautiful cheffy food you see on Instagram

Illustration for article titled Now you can eat some of the beautiful cheffy food you see on Instagram
Photo: d3sign (Getty Images)

It seems so obvious, it’s amazing no one thought of it earlier: Instead of posting food on Instagram simply for all your followers to admire, how about offering to make the same dish and deliver it for anyone willing to pay?

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Well, okay, people who are smarter than I am have been doing it since Instagram launched apparently, but now laid-off chefs have started using it as a way to earn a living.

Engadget profiled a few Insta-chefs in San Francisco, including Victor Aguilera, who makes arepas, and Dabao Singapore (formerly known as Spice Dom) and Makan Place, two specialists in Malaysian food, specifically laksa. All three businesses are doing well; the proprietors of Dabao Singapore are now talking about hiring staff to help them fill all the orders that are coming in, and Aguilera thinks he’ll continue with the arepa business even if the economy recovers.

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A word of caution if you, too, aspire to be an Insta chef: “The legality of the practice is somewhat questionable,” Engadget notes. “State laws generally allow selling food made out of a home, but permits and licenses are often still required depending on your region. Enforcement can also vary.”

So be careful out there. But if you have a particularly good Insta chef to recommend, please let us know in the comments.

Aimee Levitt is associate editor of The Takeout.

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DISCUSSION

State laws generally allow selling food made out of a home, but permits and licenses are often still required depending on your region. Enforcement can also vary.”

Enforcement varies based on the density of Karens in your location.