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Example 47,289 of why you shouldn’t post incriminating evidence on social media: Laura Goodman, most recently chef and co-owner of the Italian restaurant Carlini in the English county of Shropshire, has resigned from her position and is receiving death threats after proclaiming a misdeed on Facebook. The BBC reports that Goodman—who, like many cooks, enjoys commiserating about customers on Facebook—wrote on December 30 how she “spiked” a vegan with an animal-based food.

She revealed in a now-deleted Facebook post: “Pious, judgmental vegan (who I spent all day cooking for) has gone to bed, still believing she’s a vegan.” Goodman’s fiancee and co-owner would later clarify that she designed a vegan menu for a group of diners, but one later requested a pizza with cheese, where the non-veganness was presumably added. News of Goodman’s post became a mushroom cloud on social media, and her former restaurant Carlini has since been inundated with one-star reviews. Tripadvisor even suspended publication of new postings for Carlini, citing “an influx of review submissions that do not describe a first-hand experience.”

For her part, Goodman said she is “deeply sorry” and “deeply distressed” about the death threats she has received. Take a lesson from this: If ever you feel the urge to bitch on social media, may we suggest our preferred method of letting off steam: a quart of ice cream and whiskey.