Photo: Camrocker (iStock)

Ireland got its first Krispy Kreme last Wednesday, when a location of the popular doughnut chain opened its doors Blanchardstown, a Dublin suburb. It would seem that the fine people of Blanchardstown like a good glaze. It’s only been a week, and already their 24-hour drive-thru is no more.

And that’s nothing. I urge you, most sincerely, to click through to the Irish Independent and watch their video of the insanity, because the tranquil, extremely long line seen above has got nothing on what’s shown in the other footage.

The Independent spoke to residents in the surrounding area about what local councillor Ted Leddy called a “phenomenon.”

“Since the grand opening we haven’t had proper sleep at night. We have jobs, kids, schools, and so many elderly people living here as well,” one Grove Park resident told Independent.ie.

“Every night the queue for doughnuts is unbelievable—lights, noises, pollution and horns. All streets blocked and all cars honking at once. All night, every night.”

Advertisement

It seems clear that Krispy Kreme was unprepared for dozens of cars to line up at all hours of the night as drivers hoped for a hot-off-the-line doughnut, but here we are. One week of madness, and the branch was forced to change its hours. For now, the drive-thru will be open from 6 a.m. and 11:30 p.m. Thereafter, anyone who wants a midnight glazed will just have to get their ass out of their car and walk on in, where wait times, according to the store, have been approximately 10-12 minutes.

“We’ve listened to our neighbors and we’re making changes,” said Krispy Kreme CEO Richard Cheshire in a statement. “We anticipated a warm welcome for Krispy Kreme in Ireland and have long wanted to open a store here, but the response has been way ahead of our most optimistic expectations.”

According to the Independent, Krispy Kreme is working with Fingal County Council, Blanchardstown Centre Management, local Garda Traffic Corp and Community Liaison to find a solution to the ailment that can only be described as doughnut madness.

Advertisement